Tuesday, February 28, 2006

Signal failure

It's a common belief among leftist groups in Britain that if they spend enough time slagging off America, they don't have to offer any constructive ideas to help their own country. This explains why, when I checked the web site of the Rail, Maritime and Transport Union yesterday to find out whether a threatened Tube strike was going ahead, I didn't see any information about whether I would be able to get to class on Thursday. Instead, I saw a poll asking, 'Should the US detention camp at Guantanamo Bay be closed?' Clearly, once the RMT knows the will of its members, it's going to use its clout with the Bush Administration -- which ranks only slightly behind that of, say, the American Orchid Society.

Much as I despise Gitmo, I'm tempted to vote 'no' on this poll just to see if such heresy reduces the union's site to a jumble of code as creaky and juddering as the trains its members have to drive.

2 Comments:

At 12:54 am, Blogger daggi said...

when I checked the web site of the Rail, Maritime and Transport Union yesterday to find out whether a threatened Tube strike was going ahead, I didn't see any information about whether I would be able to get to class on Thursday. Instead, I saw a poll[...

I have no idea what timezone "7.58 a.m." (or "10.58 p.m.", depending on whether you believe the original post or the version alongside this comments box...) refers to, but as I write this (at 11.48p.m. GMT) the RMT's website contains, immediately below the rather pointless (as such things usually are, unless the question is "You are stranded upon a desert island, which spice girl will you eat first?") poll, a box called "Latest News".

The headline: "RMT Tube strike called off after LUL agree to disciplinary procedures", posted on Feb 28th, referring to a strike originally planned for Wednesday. So it seems that you wouldn't have had any trouble getting in "to class" anyway.

So unfair that those negotiations tend to go on up until the last minute, eh.
And don't most Londoners still relish at the idea of a tube and rail strike - "bloody 'ell, I'll have to stay at home again"?

Bomb scares in the early 1990s were a source of enjoyment of many for similar reasons. Not the real (IRA) bombs though, obviously.

 
At 7:04 pm, Blogger Chris Brown said...

Actually, a Tube strike that started on the 28th would stretch into the following day - what they do in practice is that nobody clocks on for their shift for 24 hours after the official start time. But it's a good point nonetheless,and thanks for commenting.

I can report that Laura did succeed in getting to and from her class in the end. But strikes aren't quite so welcome when they keep you from something you actually want to do.

 

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